miércoles, 24 de abril de 2013

Drawing - Dibujo: Ingres Jean Auguste - Part 10 - Links to paints and drawings

 Jean Auguste Ingres Portrait of a Man

 Jean Auguste Ingres Selfportrait

 Jean Auguste Ingres Study for Raphael and the Fornarina


 Jean Auguste Ingres Study for Vicomtesse d'Haussonville born Louise Albertine de Broglie


 Jean Auguste Ingres Study for Vicomtesse d'Haussonville born Louise Albertine de Broglie

 Jean Auguste Ingres Study of Baronne James de Rothschild born Betty von Rothschild

 Jean Auguste Ingres The Alexandre Lethiere Family
 
 Jean Auguste Ingres The Cosimo Andrea Lazzerini Family

 Jean Auguste Ingres The Kaunitz Sisters

 Jean Auguste Ingres Tomb

 Jean Auguste Ingres Ursin Jules Vatinelle
 
 Jean Auguste Ingres Victor Baltard

 Jean Auguste Ingres Victor Dourlen

Drawing - Dibujo: Ingres Jean Auguste - Part 10 - Links to paints and drawings

Paints - Pinturas

         Drawings - Dibujos





NASA: US - Exploring the Grand Canyon - 24.04.13

Exploring the Grand Canyon
acquired March 30, 2013
Exploring the Grand Canyon
acquired March 30, 2013
Exploring the Grand Canyon
acquired March 30, 2013 download large image (21 MB, JPEG, 9334x6222)
acquired March 30, 2013 download GeoTIFF file (114 MB, TIFF)
acquired March 29, 2013 download Google Earth file (KML)
When John Wesley Powell led an expedition down the Colorado River and through the Grand Canyon in 1869, he was confronted with a daunting landscape. At its highest point, the serpentine gorge plunged 2,400 meters (8,000 feet) from rim to river bottom, making it the deepest canyon in the United States. In just 6 million years, water had carved through rock layers that collectively represented more than 2 billion years of geological history, nearly half of the time Earth has existed.
“The wonders of the Grand Canyon cannot be adequately represented in symbols or speech,” Powell wrote in his log. “The resources of the graphic art are taxed beyond their powers in attempting to portray its features.”
Powell was, of course, seeing the canyon mainly from river level; there was no technology that provided views of the landscape from space then. If there had been, he would have seen something similar to what the Operational Land Imager (OLI) on the Landsat Data Continuity Mission (LDCM) did on March 29, 2013. LDCM is an Earth-observing satellite that launched from Vandenberg Air Force Base in February 2013.
In the image above (top), the Colorado River traces a line across the arid Colorado Plateau. Treeless areas are beige and orange; green areas are forested. The river water is brown and muddy, a common occurrence in spring when melting snows cause water levels to swell and pick up extra sediment. The black line that follows the river in the upper right side of the image is comprised of shadows.
One of the geological features that attracted Powell’s attention was a set of rapids at mile 183 of the canyon. Powell called the rapids Lava Falls (middle image), a reference to old lava flows that spilled from the Uinkaret Volcanic Field just north of the river. When lava flowed into the river, it left dams that were hundreds of meters high in some cases. These dams blocked the river and created huge reservoirs until the Colorado found ways around them. “Just imagine a river of molten rock running down into a river of melted snow. What a seething and boiling of the waters; what clouds of steam rolled into the heavens,” Powell wrote of Lava Falls.
Because of its name, many assume that the rapids at Lava Falls are caused by debris from lava flows that entered the river from the north. In fact, material from periodic landslides from Prospect Canyon to the south are the main source of debris, according to research conducted by U.S. Geological Survey scientists.
It took Powell months to navigate the gorge. By the time he had arrived in the area that is now Lake Mead, his men were weary and four had deserted. For water and sediment transported by the Colorado, the journey is much quicker; it takes just a handful of days. The flow of sediment into Lake Mead (bottom image) from the Colorado deposits a thick layer of material on the bottom of the reservoir. At the mouth of the Colorado, the area that has seen the most accumulation, sonar studies have shown that sediment thickness exceeds 80 meters (262 feet).
Note that this image is considered engineering data—data that is helping scientists and engineers ensure that the satellite and its instruments are operating as designed. Once LDCM completes its check-out period and becomes fully operational for science, NASA will pass control of the satellite to the U.S. Geological Survey and LDCM will be re-named Landsat 8.
Read more about LDCM’s birthplaces—the locations in the United States where Landsat missions have been conceived, built, and controlled—by clicking here.
Satellite image by Robert Simmon, using Landsat data from the U.S. Geological Survey and NASA. Caption by Adam Voiland.
Instrument: 
Landsat 8 - OLI

NASA: US - Exploring the Grand Canyon - 24.04.13

Music: Friedrich Gulda - Jazz. Piano and Band (Mel Lewis) - Light my Fire (The Doors cover)



video

Mel Lewis with Friedrich Gulda
Music for Piano and Band



video

Friedrich Gulda - Light my Fire

Music: Friedrich Gulda - Jazz. Piano and Band (Mel Lewis) - Light my Fire (The Doors cover)


Links:

Poetry: Aleksandr Blok - A Girl Sang a Song - Don't fear death - Gamajun. the Prophetic Bird - Bio Links


A Girl Sang a Song

A girl sang a song in the temple's chorus,
About men, tired in alien lands,
About the ships that left native shores,
And all who forgot their joy to the end.

Thus sang her clean voice, and flew up to the highness,
And sunbeams shined on her shoulder's white --
And everyone saw and heard from the darkness
The white and airy gown, singing in the light.

And all of them were sure, that joy would burst out:
The ships have arrived at their beach,
The people, in the land of the aliens tired,
Regaining their bearing, are happy and reach.

And sweet was her voice and the sun's beams around....
And only, by Caesar's Gates -- high on the vault,
The baby, versed into mysteries, mourned,
Because none of them will be ever returned.  



Don't fear death

Don't fear death in earthly travels.
Don't fear enemies or friends.
Just listen to the words of prayers,
To pass the facets of the dreads.

Your death will come to you, and never
You shall be, else, a slave of life,
Just waiting for a dawn's favor,
From nights of poverty and strife.

She'll build with you a common law,
One will of the Eternal Reign.
And you are not condemned to slow
And everlasting deadly pain. 



Gamajun, the Prophetic Bird

On waters, spread without end,
Dressed with the sunset so purple,
It sings and prophesies for land,
Unable to lift the smashed wings' couple...
The charge of Tartars' hordes it claims,
And bloody set of executions,
Earthquake, and hunger and the flames,
The death of justice, crime’s intrusion...
And caught with fear, cold and smooth,
The fair face flames as one of lovers’,
But sound with prophetic truth
The lips that the bloody foam covers!...


Poetry: Aleksandr Blok - A Girl Sang a Song - Don't fear death - Gamajun. the Prophetic Bird - Bio Links

  1. Aleksandr Blok - Wikipedia, la enciclopedia libre

    es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aleksandr_BlokCompartir
    Aleksandr Aleksándrovich Blok (ruso: Александр Александрович Блок; San Petersburgo, 16 de noviembre/ 28 de noviembre de 1880 - Petrogrado, 7 de ...
  2. Alexander Blok - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alexander_Blok - Traducir esta página
    Alexander Alexandrovich Blok was a Russian lyrical poet. Contents. 1 Life and career; 2 Work. 2.1 Symbolism. 3 Musical settings; 4 Notes; 5 External links ...
  3. The Twelve - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Twelve - Traducir esta página
    The Twelve (Russian: Двенадцать, Dvenadtsat) is a controversial long poem by Aleksandr Blok. Written early in 1918, the poem was one of the first poetic ...
     


Poesia: Jose Agustin Goytisolo - Donde tú no estuvieras - El aire huele a humo - El oficio del poeta - Bio data


Donde tú no estuvieras

Dónde tú no estuvieras,
como en este recinto, cercada por la vida,
en cualquier paradero, conocido o distante,
leería tu nombre.
Aquí, cuando empezaste a vivir para el mármol,
cuando se abrió a la sombra tu cuerpo desgarrado,
pusieron una fecha: diecisiete de marzo. Y suspiraron
tranquilos, y rezaron por ti. Te concluyeron.
Alrededor de ti, de lo que fuiste,
en pozos similares, y en funestos estantes,
otros, sal o ceniza, te hacen imperceptible.
Lo miro todo, lo palpo todo:
hierros, urnas, altares,
una antigua vasija, retratos carcomidos por la lluvia,
citas sagradas, nombres,
anillos de latón, sucias coronas, horribles
poesías...
Quiero ser familiar con todo esto.
Pero tu nombre sigue aquí,
tu ausencia y tu recuerdo
siguen aquí.
                               ¡Aquí!
donde tú no estarías,
si una hermosa mañana, con música de flores,
los dioses no te hubieran olvidado.



El aire huele a humo

                                                    A Gabriel Celaya

¿Qué hará con la memoria
de esta noche tan clara
cuando todo termine?
¿Qué hacer si cae la sed
sabiendo que está lejos
la fuente en que bebía?

¿Qué hará de este deseo
de terminar mil veces
por volver a encontrarle?

¿Qué hacer cuando un mal aire
de tristeza la envuelva
igual que un maleficio?

¿Qué hará bajo el otoño
si el aire huele a humo
y a pólvora y a besos?

¿Qué hacer?¿Qué hará? Preguntas
a un azar que ya tiene
las suertes repartidas.



El oficio del poeta

Contemplar las palabras
sobre el papel escritas,
medirlas, sopesar
su cuerpo en el conjunto
del poema, y después,
igual que un artesano,
separarse a mirar
cómo la luz emerge
de la sutil textura.
Así es el viejo oficio
del poeta, que comienza
en la idea, en el soplo
sobre el polvo infinito
de la memoria, sobre
la experiencia vivida,
la historia, los deseos,
las pasiones del hombre.

La materia del canto
nos lo ha ofrecido el pueblo
con su voz. Devolvamos
las palabras reunidas
a su auténtico dueño.



Poesia: Jose Agustin Goytisolo - Donde tú no estuvieras - El aire huele a humo - El oficio del poeta - Bio data